WoodworkingLathe.Com
Welcome to another FREE Woodworking Resource sponsored by your fellow
woodworkers at Shopsmith

LATHE TURNING
Introduction
Setup and Features
Lathe Tools
Holding Lathe Tools
Planning the Design
Lathe Safety
Lathe Speeds
Spindle Turning
Faceplate Turning
Other Special Techniques

Lathe Turning
Click here for a printer friendly version of Tip-
Pg. 1-4, Pg 5-8, Pg 9-12, Pg 13-16, Pg 17-20, Pg 21-23

Help with Downloading PDF Files

Faceplate Turning

Faceplate turning is similar to spindle turning in some respects, but very different in others. We'll point out those differences as we go through this basic procedure. As with spindle turning, faceplate turning also involves six basic steps: Mounting, rounding, sizing, shaping, sanding and parting.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-38. Prepare stock for faceplate mounting by scribing the outside diameter of your project and a circle slightly larger than the faceplate on the surface.

Mounting
To mount stock on a faceplate, first find the center of the stock by drawing diagonal lines from corner to corner. Then scribe the outside diameter of your project (the diameter desired after rounding) on the stock. Also, scribe a circle slightly larger than the diameter of the faceplate in the center of the circle you've already marked (Figure 12-38). Then cut the stock round using a bandsaw or scroll saw (Figure 12-39). This removes excess stock which makes turning safer and easier.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-39. Cut the workpiece into a circle to make turning it safer and easier.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-40. Glue a scrap block and your turning stock together, center-to-center. Put a piece of paper (brown craft paper or grocery sack) between them as shown.

If you don't want screw holes in the bottom of your finished project, you can mount the turning stock to another block of wood; then mount this block to the faceplate. Select a scrap block at least 1" thick and about the same diameter as the faceplate you'll be using. Find the center of this scrap block; then glue the block to the turning stock, center-to-center. Put a piece of paper (brown craft paper or grocery sack) in between the block and the turning stock (Figure 12-40). Warning: Leave the pieces clamped for at least 24 hours prior to turning. Later on, this paper will make it easier for you to part the scrap block from the turning.

After the glue has set up com-pletely (at least 24 hours), mount the scrap block to the faceplate with three #12 x 1-1/4" wood screws. Warning: Be sure the screws penetrate into the block at least 3/4". For large, bulky faceplate turnings use longer screws and a thicker scrap block.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-41. Mount the faceplate (with the scrap block and turning stock attached) on the main spindle of the Mark V.

Be sure the speed dial is set on “Slow.” Then mount the faceplate on the main spindle of the Mark V (Figure 12-41). Position the tool rest to turn the outside of the workpiece first. When the tool rest is properly positioned and the set-screws secured, turn the work-piece by hand to make sure it doesn't scrape against the tool rest. Make a four-point check. All four locks -power plant, carriage, tool rest height, quill-should be secure. The speed should be set at “Slow.” Turn on the Mark V and slowly turn the speed dial to the recommended speed for the operation. The stock should rotate smoothly, without excessive vibration.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-42. Before rounding a faceplate turning, check which way the wood grain runs. If the grain is perpendicular to the axis of rotation, do not attempt to shear. Scrape the workpiece round as shown.

Rounding
Round the outside diameter first. Use a gouge, just as you would for spindle turning, with this one exception: If the wood grains are perpendicular to the axis of rotation, do not attempt to shear. Scrape the workpiece round (Figure 12-42). Trying to shear will tear out large chunks of the stock. Shearing only works well when the wood grain is parallel to the axis of rotation.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-43. Use dividers or a compass to mark concentric circles. A light touch is in order.

Sizing
After the workpiece has been rounded, it should be marked to show the limits and the depth of shapes you wish to produce. With the machine turned off, work with dividers or a pencil compass to mark concentric circles (Figure 12-43), but be sure to use the tool rest for support. Use a light touch. You can use a marking gauge to mark dimension lines on the perimeter of the workpiece as shown in Figure 12-44.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-44. A marking gauge can be used to mark dimension lines on the perimeter of the workpiece.

Shaping

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-45. Turn the outside of your workpiece first. Remember: If the wood grain is perpendicular to the axis of rotation, use a scraping action.

Most woodworkers prefer to turn the outside first (Figure 12-45). Make your beads and coves in the same manner as you would for spindle turning. If the wood grain is perpendicular to the axis of rotation, scrape the desired shape in the outside of the workpiece.

When you get ready to turn the inside of the workpiece, turn the machine off. Let it come to a complete stop; then reposition the tool rest at 900 to the axis of rotation, about 1/4" in front of the workpiece. Adjust the height so that it's about 1/4" below the center of the workpiece.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-46. To shape the inside of a faceplate turning, position the tool rest in front of the stock, just below the center. Feed your chisels against the "down" side of the workpiece. This will help hold the tool against the tool rest. Click on image to see larger view.

No matter what the orientation of the wood grain, scraping is the only way to shape the inside of a faceplate turning. This is slow work, so have patience. Select a round nose chisel, turn on the lathe, and slowly feed the chisel against the “down” side of the stock (Figure 12-46).

 

When doing deep hollowing jobs, keep adjusting the tool rest to provide good chisel support even if it means partially inserting the tool rest in the hollow being formed (Figure 12-47). As you continue the

hollowing operation, periodically check the inside diameter of the turning with “inside” calipers so that you don't scrape away too much

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-47. Always place the tool rest so the chisel will have maximum support even if on hollowing jobs it means inserting the tool rest into the cavity being formed.

stock (Figure 12-48). Stop scraping whenever you've removed as much stock as you want to cut away. Figure 12-49 shows a gauge you can make to check the depth of hollowing cuts. It's just a dowel that passes through a hole in a “beam” and which is locked in place with a setscrew. Cut depths can also be checked by placing a straightedge across the face of the workpiece and then measuring from it to the bottom of the cavity.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-48. Use “inside” calipers to periodically check the inside diameter of your turning so that you don't scrape away too much stock.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-49. You can make a simple gauge to check the depth of cut on hollowing jobs.

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-50. A full-sized template can be used to mark dimension points and to check the profile. Click on image to see larger view.

Templates, like those described for spindle turnings, can also be made for faceplate work (Figure 12-50). One side of the template is used to mark dimension points, the other side has the checking profile that you use to gauge the cuts you make. Templates are always a good idea when you must turn duplicate pieces.

Sanding
When you've finished shaping the turning, turn off the machine and let it come to a complete stop. Warning: Remove the tool rest before sanding a turning on the lathe.

You can remove the feathers either by wetting the wood or by removing the faceplate from the main spindle and remounting it on the upper auxiliary spindle (Figure 12-51). This reverses the direction of rotation.

 

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-51. Remounting the faceplate on the upper auxiliaiy spindle reverses the direction of rotation so that you can sand the "feathers" off the turning.

Parting
To part a faceplate turning, first dismount the faceplate from the Mark V spindle and unscrew the faceplate from the scrap block. Clamp the scrap block in a vise and place a bench chisel against the joint between the block and the turning (where you've put the paper). Sharply rap the chisel with a mallet, driving it in between the block and the turning (Figure 12-52). The turning will part from the scrap block. Sand any paper or excess glue off the turning.

 

Click to see larger view

Figure 12-52. Part the turning from the scrap block by driving a bench chisel in between the block and the turning.

Continue to Other Special Techniques
Back to Spindle Turning

Send For Your FREE Woodworking Fact Kit and "Sawdust Therapy" TV Show.

First Name*:
Last Name*:
Street Address*:
 
City*:
State*:
Zip*:
Country*:

USA Canada
Other

E-mail Address*:

  2009 Shopsmith Inc. All rights reserved.

Policies | Contact Us | Links | Corporate Web Site